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A Citizen’s Eye View of Public Preparedness

Ft. Hood Tragedy Response Underscores Value Of First Aid Training, Blood Donation

November 6th, 2009 · No Comments

In the aftermath of the tragic shooting at Ft. Hood yesterday, the response of individuals at the base and the surrounding community displayed the value of first aid training and blood donation. First, soldiers at the scene used what they had been taught to treat the wounded. Then, hundreds of local residents responded to hospital and Red Cross urgent requests for blood

The base commander, Lt. Gen. Robert Cone said the tragedy might have been worse if not for the training and quick action of those nearby:

“People tell stories of soldiers ripping their uniforms apart and basically applying first aid. We put a great investment in soldiers’ first aid and taking care of each other. I’m sure this could have been much worse. As horrible as this was, I think it could have been much worse,” the general said.

The need for blood was significant but the response was quick and robust, according to an article in the Dallas Morning News:

Some North Texans spent Thursday evening doing what they thought could help the most after the shooting at Fort Hood – giving blood. Both the local Red Cross chapter and Carter BloodCare centers began accepting donations for shooting victims Thursday evening. Those efforts will continue today.

“I heard on TV that they needed blood, so I came down here,” said Matt Williams of Irving. He has two sons, one currently serving in Iraq and another who recently completed a tour of duty. ”If my son was hurt at a base, I hope someone close by would go and give blood,” Williams said. Bill Clements was donating platelets Thursday evening, something he started doing on a regular basis after the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001.

MARK M. HANCOCK/Special Contributor

PHLEBOTOMIST MELISSA VILLARUEL, DONOR BILL CLEMENTS AT RED CROSS BLOOD CENTER (Photo: Dallas Morning News)

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Tags: Red Cross · Volunteering

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